Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27
that the economies matter. i think whether it's been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on economic feminism, i don't know canada's net position with china, but it does raise this fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or a liability. you know, the conference in dallas yesterday were recently, where someone made a comment that an american source of power to every different in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is
of the folks like speaker foley and the senate leader george mitchell and bob michaels who was the minority leader in the house there's no question of this could have happened without them coming to the table and understanding how important it was to achieve the result. but i also have to emphasize what i believe is the fundamental katulis and that that is a president who was determined to solve this issue. absolutely, unequivocally determined. and as we see not only was he willing but he ended up in my opinion sacrificing tremendous political capital in order to do what he felt the country needed at that time there are a lot of folks that like these agreements to take place in a climate where there is no politics. it will never happen. it will never happen because politics is the cement that holds the system together, not what divides at. in my opinion there are three political aspect that have to be looked at in what happened in 1990 and certainly have parallels to what is going on today. does the politics of the differences in philosophy. they're certainly is a liberal perspective genera
this country in an exceptional way. his famous bob dole and in russell, kansas who served in world war ii, was severely disabled, came home uncertain of their future but dedicated his life to public service. i don't know how many weeks to months or years i looked in bob dole's life, but he think the passage of this convention i on disabilities to place's work at the moment. we owe it to bob dole, two of the disabled him who stand with locked arms taking us to pass this convention. we ought to disabled people across america and around the world to stand up once again for the race of the disabled and for expanding opportunity. not just in america, but across the world. people say we are an exceptional nation. there's a little bit of egotism in that statement, but i believe it is. i ask for additional 30 seconds. i believe it is factual and america is an exceptional nation that said sorting the believe that freedom and liberty and opportunity should be for everyone within our country and around the world. today is our chance. let no minor argument over some minor political issues from focusi
that joke about bob is that he is a lovable guy. [laughter] are we going to make a speech about bob? because i will. i've got nothing to do. bob is a great guy. this is on c-span and he will say why are you defending me? bob is a great guy. bob performs a service. [laughter] i should shut up. i should just quit. another thing i have in common with ronald reagan, he championed trickle-down economics. i have a weak bladder. on june 12, 19 and seven he told soviet premier gorbachev to tear down this wall. i like vodka. he calls russia rashawn evil empire. every day i called dana perino and evil person. i know you guys think she's adorable and she talks about that dog. [applause] you guys actually think jasper is a dog? that is an armenian man that she hired as an indentured serving and wearing a fur costume. all she does is go around central park and take pictures of this poor sweaty men man all over central park. it's disgusting. somebody has to tell the truth. lastly, ronald reagan was a charismatic leader who influence millions of people concerning freedom and individuality around the world
there are but to the regulations favor and how they impact everybody else. >> host: david rothkopf is our guest. bob in marina, california is the next caller. >> it is an honor to talk to you. i met you and some years back at the conference in monterey, california and i remember the educational challenges not only to reach the masses but also to educator the children of the superrich and that the blacks on route nadir at observation the only the superrich can save us. i would like to get an update on your take of the educational challenge we face by your analysis which i think is absolutely superb. you are really a beacon of light in the darkness for us all. >> host: >> guest: education is our biggest challenge, drive economic growth and we have an educational system that works on a model developed at the university of bologna in the year 800 where a guy stands in front of a rule of 800 and talk with them. and into every classroom using video and the internet. we need to recognize and education assistance designed for an agrarian era and give kids the summer of doesn't make sense and an educational system des
the individual agent bernie bob person entity deciding on their own. there is court oversight. court oversight in the fact the warrants are issued by a court. it is independent oversight, judicial oversight of the entity. what the amendments to this change to presumption of delay to a presumption of notification by saying for law enforcement, investigative law-enforcement within 10 days disclosure must be made unless a court order is applied for a 90 day increments, were disclosure notification is delayed. the concern very slight change some pain that has worked very well to this point, has protected the public, protected the integrity of the investigations would be snowed demonstrated violation on the part of law-enforcement in many roles in regulation. granik, epca should be updated. with the advent of cloud computing and how we act culturally in terms of how we live our lives, e-mail and facebook the law should be looked at and updated. unfortunately, a lot of what has been proposed for change at this point is not to the advantage of law-enforcement investigations, but to their detriment. >
the vote we had a wonderful ceremony in the dirksen building honoring bob dole. you see, yesterday was the international disability rights day. international disability rights day yesterday. so they wanted to honor bob dole for all he'd done, and it was a wonderful event, wonderful. i saw people over there honoring bob dole for all the work he he'd done on disability rights who voted against the bill today. i saw them, i thought wait a minute, since they're going to honor all the work bob dole had done on disability and bob dole was one of the strongest supporters of the crpd as it's called, came over here today in his wheelchair with his wife, former senator elizabeth dole. and yet -- and yet people voted against it. i don't get it. veterans. mr. president, there was a young veteran sitting in the gallery today and i met him yesterday the first time, senator kerry spoke at length about him, his name is dan brzezinski and i'm going to ask consent to put his op-ed in the record at the conclusion of my speech. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. harkin: as i also want to pu
to the senator about that. first, we have the amazing treat of bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be joining us in just a second. first, welcome, all the people out in live stream land. we'll be taking your questions on hash tag "politico" breakfast. tweet us, welcome to the others watching. appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership this year, including conventions, election night, and so we're very, very excited to be ail to bring these substantive conversations about the most important issues driving washington to you, thanks to the bank of america. thank you, john, and thank you to your colleagues. you may have gotten cards. we'll be bringing you into the conversation, think about what you're going to ask. without further adieu, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward? [applause] >> thank you. saving seats with my notes. i'll pick those up. >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> okay, thank you, thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has beco
captures the human spirit. >> journalist and author bob woodward had an interview with blood it goes white house correspondent, mike allen. mr. woodward's latest book is the price of politics about a 2011 deathdealing negotiations in washington. mike allen also interviews marco rubio. they discuss the budget and taxes in the future of the republican party. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> good morning. welcome to playbook breakfast. thank you for coming out so early. we are excited to have an amazing doubleheader today. we are going to talk to senator rubio last night gave one of the first formal speeches to the head to the future of the republican party. we'll talk to senator rubio about that. next we have bob woodward who has a fantastic book out on the last grand bargain negotiations is going to be in just a second. first, welcome to people in lifestream land. will be taking your questions on hash tag political practice. welcome c-span, welcome others who are watching. we're appreciative to the bank of america for making these conversations possible. we had a great partnership t
's not even bob dole's treaty, although he certainly is a person who has been deeply involved. the vote on the treaty is the right thing to do on its merits. i think that it's important to note that every major veterans' group -- madam president, i ask that the list of the veterans' groups in support be included in the record at this time. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: i've not forgotten that 36 republicans signed a letter opposing consideration of any treaty during the lame duck, but there's no reason why we shouldn't have a vote on this. the letter says that they would oppose consideration, but we did have the motion to proceed. some may be worried about passing a treaty in a lame-duck session. the argument has no basis in the constitution or the senate practice. since the 1970's alone the senate has approved treaties during lame-duck sessions a total of 19 times. there's nothing special or different about lame-duck sessions. i'd like to address a few of the misconceptions about the treaty that i keep hearing. it's true that the treaty establishes a committee,
, he said. i met jim webb in my office not far from here. as a result of senator bob kerry asking me if i would spend some time with him, i was happy to do so, i'll never forget that meeting, just the three of us in the room. for those of us who have worked with bob kerrey, he was such -- he is and was such a vibrant person. it's almost mischievous, i guess is the way to put it. you could just tell how he had just a little touch of differentness. and when he brought him in to visit with me, i learned very quickly they were both warriors. bob kerrey, a navy seal, recipient of the medal of honor, and jim webb, as we've said, navy cross, two silver stars, two bronze stars. both veterans of the vietnam war. as we sat talking, it was obvious that they were both fighters, warriors, and jim certainly proved that in his 2006 campaign. the reason bob wanted me to visit with him is because jim webb had decided he wanted to run for senate. what did i think of it? well, i probably told jim what a lot of people told him -- you want to run for the senate? the election's right upon us. no, he said,
a lot of time in this room as well when i worked at cbo, but if bob is happy to be up here, i used to sit behind him and wait for him to turn around and ask me a question which he never did because he knew everything. i want to associate myself with three points that have been made, and just make a quick couple additional appointments. the first is i want to agree with every single word that has been said about george hw bush's leadership in 1990. i mean, i actually think that this is, you know, sort of the unsung story of our effort to get deficits under control, but i guess i want to broaden that to say that i think presidential leadership is absolutely important. i do not think congress as an institution is very well positioned to lead an effort involved inflicting pain on people. i think they need to go with someone, and whether it's two parties in congress or the president, that's important. it helps to be a second term president and not a first term president. i think they have more than what president bush could exercise that leadership, and i hope that he does so. i don't t
+ in brief mncs further trauma at hands of the press. bob and sally dollar did mr. speaker, it's easy to forget how about the revelations about what happened to them and their daughter and their courage in speaking out, we would simply not be here today. jerry and kate mccann who suffered so much in shows so much courage, his daughter serving the same in her private diary was published by "news of the world." mr. speaker, they gave evidence to serve the wider public interest and i'm sure the whole house pays tribute to their courage. it is they who must be at the forefront of our minds today. mr. speaker, much is written about the reason for this inquiry. a free press is essential to a functioning democracy. the press must be a little hold the powerful, especially politicians to account without fear or favor. that is part of the character of our country. at the same time i do not want to live in a country where can i see families like the mccann is can see their lives torn apart for profit and powerful interests in the press know they won't be held to account. this is about the charac
] >> bob samuels -- this working? bob samuels from "the washington post." this is for admiral mullen. i think the proposals of the administration are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000 and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there is much speculation that further cuts in the pentagon budget would lead to additional cuts in the both the army and the marines. if the united states was put in the position where it had to occupy and protect the oil fields of the persian gulf for an extended period of time, say five, six years, are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the, one of the reasons i at least was able to get through the tour as chairman is try not to speculate too much on hypotheticals. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now -- i think they're in the '13 budget, so basically they've been on the hill, the beginnings of them, they've been on the hill for the better part of a year, and they are reductions both the chiefs of those two services and the chairman all support. clearly -- and i did as well when i was chairman over a
heroic things during that war. and it also has the support of former senate majority leader bob dole, certainly a patriot. senator dole, a disabled veteran from world war ii, who led the fight to pass the treaty, was here yesterday urging republicans to support it. now, mr. president, think about that. robert dole, who was grievously injured in world war ii, spent more than two years in a hospital, he came to this senate floor, and the first speech he gave was on disabilities, and we needed to do something about it. he was here -- he led the fight to pass the treaty, urging republicans to support it. a few republicans greeted him as he was in his wheelchair here. they greeted this 89-year-old war hero, i repeat, patriot, who just last week was in walter reed hospital. then one by one, all but a handful of them voted against the treaty, ensuring its failure. but their professed reasons for opposing it had no basis in fact -- none. most republicans acknowledge that. some use an excuse, well, it is a lame duck. we shouldn't be doing it in a lame duck. i mean, wow ... and there's no just
from scott and let's go to bob. >> i want to comment, getting players engage is very important. i got to be careful but the three pilot programs, one of the aspect that was really beneficial is nfl alumni players came out and they were genuinely presenting their feelings about the game and talking openly to parents, in northern virginia, made a real difference and one of the points you made is how we come together, and the science and medical industry that we have to embrace that and act accordingly but i am pleased with the players association and the nfl and encouraging their players to come out and engage parents to talk about what is going on and parents are asking hard questions but in the end you want to be informed demand there is a movement. there are steps being taken to try to address this complex issue and the conversation will continue but they are definitely engaging. >> this conversation started with the idea of 14 and under so i will give you the comment. >> thanks very much. let me wrap quickly by saying what i started with, it is great that all of us understand no bra
where bob jones university lost its tax exemption because the court argued there was a compelling interest in not having the state collaborate with racism. very similarly they should collaborate with the oppression of women but a practice of pauley emery, what would the objection to that be? of course administratively impossible because it creates so many layers of families and former families but in our legal tradition administrative difficulty has to be really extreme to be compelling state interest. one case i know of that trumped the religious interest was a case where an american family refused to allow their child to have a social security, they said that was so fundamental in an organized society, it turns out she had already been given one anyway so the case was very odd in that respect. that shows you that you have to go far out on a limb to trump the religious claim. u.s. about reynolds. reynolds is a case in the 1870s where a polygamous mormon man lost, the first case to test the free exercise clause because it was not applied to state law yet and therefore only the ter
appstore is one of the best things about this. >>host: i have heard of that (...) >>guest: it is not bob's appstore. >>host: do they have some good things? >>caller: in fact 22 million. >>host: tell them about the free stuff! >>guest: there are 1.2 million books you can buy but millions literally of books that are free. alyce carone made me laugh, she said her father uses a candle and she says what book did you buy? he said why would i ever get a book? there is millions for free. --uses a can pole. public domain books are free. --kindle we are sending you with what comes along along with your stylus anti- earbuds and simply to impress $25 certificate, we are giving you a month free of amazon- prime. --and the earbuds. there is 180,000 books like the harry potter series is part of that 180,000 books. you can borrow them for for using amazon-primetown of movie is also an tv series. cynthia mentioned down at the iman ago, i do not know if that is one of them.w down abbya moment ago. if all you wanted to do download free applications, music, magazines you could certainly do that. but
and found a few off the record and one on the record, bob bennet, lieutenant to mitch mcconnell saying, yes, mitch told us all we're going it try to block everything we can, and if we cannot, throw sand in the works, as much as we can, and, of course, the process of filibustering, which requires the two days for the cloture motion to ripen, a lot of time on the floor as you go through the process, and then if you achieve cloture, allowing the 30 hours of the post cloture debate, and you can demand the full 30 hours, and you don't even have to debate becomes a very tempting tool to use to soak up an enormous amount of floor time because if you have an ambitious agenda as the majority, floor time becomes a very precious commodity, and it's that process, then, you know, you can point to examples of bills and nominations that ultimately pass unanimously that were taken through. in the case of bill's, in many instances, a motion, filibuster on the motion to proceed, which ended up with a cloture motion that passed overwhelmingly, but then another filibuster on the bill itself, and then we see fi
and talk to senators and found a few off the record and one on the record. bob bennett that was in the senate of mitch mcconnell and he said yes, mitch mcconnell said that we are going to try to block everything. we can't block it, we will throw as much sand in the works as we can. of course, the process of filibustering, which requires the two days for the cloture motion to rise, a lot of time on the floor, as we go through this process, and then if you achieve this cloture, allowing 30 hours of post-cloture debate, you can command a full 30 hours that you don't even have to debate. it becomes a very tempting tool to use -- four times become a precious commodity. it points to what passes unanimously that was taken through. in the case of bills, emotion, a filibuster on the motion to proceed. which ended up with a cloture motion that passed overwhelmingly. all designed to use up more floor time. that is the restoration of the majority. now we can get to the appropriation of the minority. in the fact is that we do have something that is a chicken and egg problem. we saw
other countries. that's why bob dole and captain dan pe berzynski want us to appe this treaty. i've heard nothing from the other side that outweighs the reality of that consideration for persons, not just veterans, all persons with disabilities. what's really at stake here is big. the outcome here will not, despite the fear, it's not going to change one election here in the senate. it's not going to decide one of the primaries that i fear are distorting the politics of our country. but you know what, mr. president? it will decide whether some people live or die in another country, where there is no accountability and only united states values and standards are the difference to the prospects of someone with a disability. in some countries, children are disposed of, killed because they have a disability. our treaty can actually help prevent that. in some countries, children do not get to go to school and certainly have no prospects of a future simply because they are born with a disability. this treaty will help offer hope where there is none. the united states could actually sit
,000 -- this is just new york. bob will talk about, and frank talked about new jersey which has similar levels of damage. in katrina 18,000 businesses. because of the density of the population, it is a much greater economic impact on our region, of course, and on the nation. than otherwise. so despite all this pain we can't entirely fault those who came before us for building this great metropolis without adequate flood protections. the threat was not the same, the technology of flood protection was not what it is today, and at the same time we know that the 105-year floods were rare events, and now they're every few years. so where does that bring us? in the days since sandy, much has been made about what future flood protections new york needs to adapt to the new 21st century climate. there are a vast array of opinions and ideas from one extreme to the other, and i commend my colleagues in government and academia for having the courage to think outside the box in advocating for the future new york. some preliminary research has suggested a dutch-like system of floodgates in new york harbor a
republican senator bob corker discussed the january fiscal deadline at an event hosted by bloomberg government and deloitte consulting. see that at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine, but we have not coordinated care and all the services end up having so many cracks at the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. you've got to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people overall? on a global level, what are we doing sometimes? of course now we've got the institute of medicine report pain 30% of everything we do may not be necessary and health care. when we step back from a 30% of all the medications are prescribed come to test the order come, the procedures, this is something i think, which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> defense secretary, leon panetta went to walter reed military medical center to celebrate the hospital's first anniversary and to pay tribute to medical professionals in the military. the hospital was created out of the merger of walter reed army medical center
is a lariat design it has aquamarine cool mother of pearl nuggets and also genuine pearlquartz bob sprinkled throughout nodded and jewelers leather -- knotted on jewelers leather. >>guest: this because wanted to wear it.i love the blue with brown and that is a fresh look even in the winter you could wear this with the cream turtleneck. this could be worn like a scarf. some of you like to put around your neck and feed it throw you can locket behind a gemstone so it will not tokyo.-- not choke you.i like this piece it can do so many things. or you could wrap this around the front and wear it like a choker dept. >>host: we can show this on the model she is wearing levitt style. a lane from new york is shopping elaine we hear you live in herkimer county >>caller: am originally from herkimer county >>guest: so cool, this is a little bit of home for you >>caller: yes. exactly. are a very good value. i already have tennis bracelet and a necklace that i bought last year >>guest: you are completing your set, a good for you >>host: you are lucky to get the bracelet it went so fast a lot of
-night. >> not really. >> is bob still here? what would you like to ask senator rubio? [laughter] >> are you still doing this shit? [laughter] spent ask him a real question. i decline. [laughter] >> okay. last night talked about a new direction. one of the things that you talk about is -- [inaudible] and how to mike higher education in how to reform programs be the number one thing you would do, you can do as a freshman minority speakers i don't think there's a number one thing. there's a number of things. we got to get them all. the biggest obstacle we face in the 21st century doesn't look like the 21st century. not just in a jewel to graduate high school. still continues to be a significant part of folks that are going into college but it's also the 38 year old who decided to go back to school and get a degree. that was my sister. it's also the 25 year old that's after 10 years of being out of high school has been stuck in a service area jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves to that greatness is that technological advance our not only going to lower the time and costs of getting that kind
of the senate foreign relations committee for her work, senator bob menendez on the foreign relations committee. all those were very instrumental in dealing with this. senator durbin who has been a real champion on human rights. i want to acknowledge kyle parker, a staff person from the helsinki commission who was very instrumental in the development of this legislation, and i want to also acknowledge senator lieberman's work. i know he will be speaking in a few minutes. it was senator lieberman and senator mccain and myself that first suggested that we should pass the magnitsky bill, it's the right thing to do, but we certainly shouldn't let pntr go without attaching the magnitsky bill. i want to thank senator lieberman and thank senator mccain for raising that connection. it was the right thing to do. first of all, it allowed us to get this human rights tool enacted. secondly, i think it gave us the best chance to get the pntr bill done in the right form. so i want to thank both of them for their leadership on that. in 1974, we passed the jackson vanik law. it dealt with the failure of the so
should return to play. >> thank you, tom for wilderness foreign and obviously to bob who is that the science and discussion forward dramatically because one of the things we all know is we can't not do nothing or anything. see how many negatives are put in there to make a positive. we have to do something. as a clinician that these kids and families and our clinics in seeing the major education deficit on the fields today in all sports frankly, but also seeing the outcomes. some of the things that raise talking about in terms of understanding forces is really important and we just completed some work in developing measures they are using so we can understand their cognitive symptom kinds of effects of these to kids. i think that's very, very important outcome to what we need to link up with the games. from the perspective -- actually was at the aspen institute this summer, where u.s. nabobs question about, should we be eliminating football -- tackling a football before the age of 14. at that point i couldn't speak, although we did speak that night. one of the things i sai
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27